24
Mar
12

Lenten Observance: Day 28

Tao 55 & 56:

55 makes the analogy of the Master to the baby who is not yet formed, but is one with the Tao, and so his cries never hoarsen his voice.  As we grow, we get into certain habits and behaviors and those habits and behavior program our minds to view the world in certain ways.  Someone who is a pure rationalist may not be able to endure even the talk of the spirit or God.  I remember hearing Joseph Campbell once say that he was a guy who fiddled with this idea and that idea (sounded like being flexible in the Tao), and he said that he learned a lot that way, but that there was another path, that of the saint, who immersed himself in a particular path, and that allowed the saint to have insights that he would never have.  The tunnel vision of the saint allowed him to have microscopic or telescopic vision.  But the point here seems to be more about flexibility, and not becoming too fixed in our ways.

56: “Those who know don’t talk.  Those who talk don’t know.”  If we are talking, we are not listening.  We are assuming that we know, and block off other avenues of information and enlightenment.  This reminds me of the story (mentioned earlier in these observances) of the Westerner wanting to learn all about Zen, and the Zen master poured him tea, and then kept pouring, until the man said “Stop!”  The Zen master pointed out that the Westerner had his mind already made up and so was like the tea cup full of tea, unable to receive anything else.

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